Print testing

The past few days I’ve been thinking more about how to present the final pieces at the assessment and the graduate showcase. One of the ideas I’ve been toying with is to insert the posters into a weekend supplement or a center page pullout. I’ve been looking around for ways to emulate newsprint, and so far the closest I’ve come is to use a plotter printer, on ~50gsm paper.

The texture of the paper is not unlike newsprint, though there’s a larger grain to the paper, and it feels just slightly thicker. It’s difficult to see I know, but my digi-cam is a cheap useless one that’s about 4 years old, and photography isn’t my forte.

To see it up close it looks as though it came straight out of the paper, which is great, and after handling it my hands were inky black! Not sure I’ll be able to mass print these though as printing it on the plotter has to be done overnight. Perhaps a limited edition of 10 if people want? I know some have already contacted me via email about getting prints, and if demand is strong enough then I guess archival ink on semi-gloss might be a better choice.

Outdoor pictogram headlines

Just thinking that it might be nice to see these pictogram headlines concepts I did adopted into a functioning platform for use in public spaces, and perhaps even incorporated into a news website.

The idea would be that a simple application would pull headlines from the BBC News website, or any website, and seperate the headline into individual words. It would then check a database to see if there is a pictogram associated with that word and display it. This would loop for all words until the headline is complete. If there is no pictogram for the word available, then it will just display the word and update an online list that symbols for word ‘X’ are needed.

Here’s a couple of examples mocked up with stock photos to see what I’m talking about.

Pictogram Headlines
A quick concept idea for using headlines displayed as a series of pictograms. This proposal could be installed in a number of public spaces, train stations, bus depots, airports, etc. on large screen visual displays. The headlines in pictograms would cross multiple language barriers, and carry the English alternative underneath. When people are used to seeing them then they will eventually be able to quickly see the news just by using the pictures.

Anyone have any thoughts? I know I’d find it more interesting when at a train/bus station to have rotating headlines.

Help. What don’t you understand?

OK so I’d really appreciate some input if you’ll indulge me. Not much, just a couple of lines.

I have a presentation in a couple of days about this project. I’m trying to put together some sort of list of frequently asked questions in order to give a better presentation of the work. I know what my aim was, and I can understand the choices I’ve made being as I’m the one that made them, but is there anything about this project that you don’t understand or would like further clarification about?

This is your chance to get stuck in and really tell me what you think. If you need your memory jogging work can be found via the designlab.

What don’t you understand?

Thanks.

The art of being concise, or not

I just thought I’d post this little update as I’m currently about half way through a 6000 word minimum illustrated report on the work I’m doing for university.

I think I’m a pretty concise person. When I write anything I usually try to get to the point pretty quickly, and don’t like to spin anything out too long unless it’s funny or there’s a payoff at the end. I have to say, there’s only so much ‘padding’ you can add to a description of what I’m doing and why. Most of the descriptions I write about my work are those that I’ve taken the time to explain in 100 words or less, thereby being concise and to the point.

I’m not going to say ‘bullshitting’, but ‘padding’ a report, is hard work. Nobody wants to read anything unnecesary in a report document, but 6000 words minimum is 6000 words minimum.

One week of the Guardian: Saturday

Well the end is pretty frikkin’ nigh. This is the final news day of the series as The Guardian doesn’t issue on Sunday.

Todays visual plots all of the headlines in the Guardian on a grid, colour categorised and ordered as to their position in the paper. Relationships are formed for authors who appear more than once. The idea of this was to create a simple layout where patterns become apparent, where heavily coloured sections are representative of special dedicated sections within the paper, and authors can be tracked through their articles.

One week of the Guardian: Saturday Preview 1

One week of the Guardian: Saturday Preview 2

One week of the Guardian: Saturday Preview 3

One week of the Guardian: Saturday Preview 4

One week of the Guardian: Saturday Preview 5

Incase you didn’t notice, this was more of a type based graphic. ;)

The Series

This is one day in a series that takes the news from one week of the Guardian newspaper, and visually represents it as a series of static visualisations. You may also be interested in:

  • Monday - A typographic and layout based piece previewing the contents of the paper as ingredients.
  • Tuesday - A list of headlines contained in the paper illustrated with references to the article or subject.
  • Wednesday - A polar graph inspired layout mapping the stories and categories on colour coded concentric circles.
  • Thursday - A content map showing the relationships between information inside of a circular container.
  • Friday - A text heavy piece highlighting the sheer amount of information contained within in the paper.
  • Saturday - A grid based typographic piece, showing patterns and author relationships through the paper.

One week of The Guardian: Friday

Yet another ‘One Day of The Guardian’ visualisation is complete. Todays visual illustrates the sheer amount of words in the paper. I wanted to do something like this, something rather simple, as after doing some research on word counts in books I found out that I could pretty much read a book from cover to cover in the time it would take me to read through two or three issues of The Guardian! That’s alot of words, however they’re arranged.

Anyways, I wanted this to be a predominantly text based visual, using all of the words in the newspaper to make my point. I was inspired a little by the Beatles Poster by Daniel Eatock, and the Motorolla 75th Anniversary poster by Fibre designs. As a friend said, “it kind of throws away the idea of a 32 page paper”. After he said that it hit me that everyday some layout designer(s) has to fit all of this information into sections, sub-sections, pages, and columns. The blocked details highlight some of the more important points behind the text.

One week of the Guardian: Friday Preview 1

One week of the Guardian: Friday Preview 2

One week of the Guardian: Friday Preview 3

Trust me when I say, there’s alot of this text! So much infact, Illustrator nearly died at trying to draw all the vectors whenever I moved the page or zoomed in and out.

The Series

This is one day in a series that takes the news from one week of the Guardian newspaper, and visually represents it as a series of static visualisations. You may also be interested in:

  • Monday - A typographic and layout based piece previewing the contents of the paper as ingredients.
  • Tuesday - A list of headlines contained in the paper illustrated with references to the article or subject.
  • Wednesday - A polar graph inspired layout mapping the stories and categories on colour coded concentric circles.
  • Thursday - A content map showing the relationships between information inside of a circular container.
  • Friday - A text heavy piece highlighting the sheer amount of information contained within in the paper.
  • Saturday - A grid based typographic piece, showing patterns and author relationships through the paper.